Posts Tagged ‘Mushrooms’

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Farmer’s Market Quiche

August 14, 2011

I love to go to the farmer’s market for fresh vegetables.  But, if you’re anything like me, you tend to get a little overzealous – buying entirely too many vegetables only to get them home and realizing they take up a lot more fridge space than you’d planned for.  And there’s no conceivable way you can eat them all before they go bad.

The crust, vented and ready to blind bake.

Of course, it makes me almost physically ill to have to throw them away, weeks later – each moldy, meely, or otherwise unsavory bag I plunk into the trash forcing me to admit I wasted my money.

All of the fresh, farmer's market finds!

Sautéing the vegetables.

The makings of the egg mixture.

I don’t know what made me think of this recipe, other than it’s been a while since I’ve had quiche and we used to have it pretty often when I was growing up.  I really love the versatility and inexpensiveness of quiche.  It can be made out of almost anything.  It works for breakfast, lunch, or dinner.  And all for around $0.50 in eggs!

And the vegetables are in!

You can use literally any ingredients you have on hand for this recipe (feel free to mix and match from what I’ve used).  I could easily see using peppers, spinach, tomatoes, broccoli, eggplant, … stop me anytime.  I had several ears of corn on hand to use, so I put it in with the egg mixture and the dish became something between a quiche and a corn pudding (and that’s FINE with me, because I love a good corn pudding).

The filling is in the asparagus decoration is on.

As far as cheese goes, my favorite cheese to use in a quiche is a good, sharp swiss.  Though in this case, I treated it like a clean-out-the-fridge recipe and used the remnants  of cheddar and mozzarella I had on-hand.

Golden brown from the oven.

Now, the notes:

I used our classic tart crust, because it’s just so rich and delicious and simple (You’ll find the recipe here).  Of course, you can always go the easy route and buy a refrigerated pie crust, in which case I urge you to make two quiches and freeze one for later, because it really makes enough filling for two.

You can use regular milk or even cream instead of the buttermilk, if you prefer.  I thought buttermilk felt more farmy (plus it was nearing its expiration date…).

Sliced and served (and promptly consumed, no doubt).

Farmer’s Market Quiche

  • 1 Pie/Tart Crust
  • 2 Tablespoons Olive Oil
  • ½ Cup Chopped Onion
  • 1Cup Sliced Zucchini
  • 1 Cup Sliced Mushrooms
  • 5 Eggs
  • 1 Cup Shredded Cheese
  • ½ Stick Butter, Melted
  • ½ Cup Buttermilk
  • Salt and Pepper to taste
  • A dash of cayenne pepper, if you’re into that
  • 10 Asparagus Spears

Prepare the pie crust(s) and press into a tart pan or pie plate.  Prick air vents with a fork and blind bake for 10 minutes at 400 degrees before adding the filling.

In the meantime, sautée onions, zucchini, and mushrooms in olive oil.  Remove from pan to cool slightly.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the eggs with the next 5 ingredients (through cayenne pepper), mixing until incorporated.

Place sautéed vegetables at the bottom of the pie crust, and pour egg mixture over the vegetables (only fill ¾ of the way to avoid overflow).  Place your asparagus spears evenly around the top of the quiche, pressing down into the mixture slightly, to create a starburst pattern.

Bake for 15 minutes at 400 degrees, then lower the temperature to 375 and bake for an additional 25-35 minutes, until set.  Slice and serve hot, warm, or cold.  It keeps well in the fridge for 2 or 3 days, covered.

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Biscuit Empanadas, or The Semi-Homemade Vegetarian

June 4, 2011

Most of the recipes we’ve shared so far are almost entirely homemade.  With the exception of a few ingredients, like puff pastry dough (still working on getting brave enough to do that myself), we try to make lots of our dishes from scratch.  But there’s no way around the fact that sometimes we get really busy and pressed for time, and dinner takes a backseat to the million other things we have going on (and then so does our blogging).  But of course, we have to eat.  So I resort to what Sandra Lee would call “Semi-Homemade” recipes…or, eating lots of pre-packaged foods that have been tricked out slightly.  And I’ve been hesitant to share a lot of those recipes here because they feel a little like I’m cheating.  But I realized, why not post them?  Most of you are just as busy as I am, and everyone is looking for a little semi-homemade action once in a while to make his or her life easier.  So here goes.

My "supporting cast" of packaged ingredients.

I came up with this recipe when I was craving both the spiciness of tacos and the warm comfort of biscuits.  I called them biscuit empanadas in my head, and was thinking I probably was incorrect on the terminology, but a quick Google search told me “empanada” comes from the Spanish word “empanar” which means “to wrap in bread”.  Though traditionally it would be a pie or pastry crust, biscuits are still bread, so I wasn’t too far off the mark!  Empanadas can be filled with various types of meats and vegetables, and either baked or fried.  Mine are baked – I think I’d go to hell if I tried to deep fry a biscuit (Paula Deen and I, both).

Mushrooms, onions, and my "supporting cast" in the background.

I decided to do the filling just like I would any other taco meat, and got a frozen package of Morningstar Farms ground soy crumbles (the vegetarian version of ground beef) and a package of taco seasoning.  To bulk it up and make it fresher, I added fresh onion and mushrooms.  Then took a can of refrigerated biscuits and rolled each one out to a flat oval, then filled with the “meat”, cheddar cheese, and sliced jalapenos (from a jar, no less!), then folded them over, crimped the edge, and baked to perfection – or, according to package instructions.  Couldn’t be easier.  Or more delicious.

Sautéing the onions, meat, and mushrooms. About to add the seasonings.

Thoughts:

Obviously, this recipe could be made non-vegetarian by using real ground beef or ground turkey to make your filling.  If you decide to go this route, be sure to drain your meat really well because you don’t want your empanadas to be oozy or soggy (On a side note, I was realizing the other day that of all the adjectives used to describe food – and there are some weird ones – soggy is probably the worst.  Nothing good is ever soggy.).

Rolling out the biscuits. Ready to fill!

I used the “hot” taco seasoning blend and still added a dash more cayenne pepper to kick it up.  If you’re not a huge fan of super spicy foods, feel free to use the mild seasoning and eliminate the cayenne.

This recipe could easily be given a more Southwest feel by adding corn and black beans to the filling, and dipping in a Southwest ranch dip instead of the sour cream.  You could also add refried beans to bulk it up.

Filling the biscuit/empanada.

I used the buttermilk Grand’s biscuits, but I’m sure any variety would work fine.  Flaky layered biscuits might give it more of a pie crust feel.  You could even do mini empanadas with the normal-sized biscuits.  Make sure when crimping the edges, you really press firmly – don’t be shy – if you don’t create a good seal, all the filling will seep out while baking.

For the soy crumbles, the brand is irrelevant, though I find Morningstar Farms (in the green bag) to be the best.  Boca is a little too salty for my taste.  The recipe uses half a bag, but with the rest and the remainder of the onion and mushroom, you can make a delicious meat sauce for spaghetti!  Just add some garlic, a large can of diced tomatoes, a small can of tomato paste, and Italian herbs of your choice.

Crimping the edges of the empanada with a fork to seal it.

Biscuit Empanadas

(Makes enough for 1 can of Grand’s biscuits, or 8 empanadas)

  • olive oil, for pan
  • ½ bag of soy crumbles, or ½ pound ground beef/turkey
  • ½ a medium onion, diced
  • 1 cup sliced mushrooms (I used cremini, any are fine)
  • ½ packet taco seasoning
  • ¼ tsp. cayenne pepper, or more to taste
  • 1 can Grand’s biscuits
  • 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese
  • pickled sliced jalapenos, if desired

Before Baking: Filled, sealed, vented, and sprinkled with cheese.

In a large pan, sauté onion, mushrooms, and soy crumbles in olive oil.  Add taco seasoning and cayenne.  *If cooking soy crumbles, you will need to add ~1/4 water when you add the seasoning, because it cooks drier than real meat.  When onions and mushrooms are thoroughly cooked, remove from heat.  Begin rolling out each biscuit to a thin, flat oval.  Scoop meat filling into the center of each biscuit (it may take a couple tries to find the perfect amount, but you don’t want too much or it won’t seal).  Top with a sprinkle of cheddar cheese and 3-4 jalapenos.  Fold biscuit over to form a half moon, and crimp the edges with a fork to seal.  Use a knife to score the top to create a vent.  Sprinkle the tops with cheese, if desired, and bake on a foil-lined sheet according to biscuit package directions (or until golden brown).  Serve with sour cream.

After Baking: Cheese melted, biscuits golden brown and delicious.

The finished product: Plated and ready to go with a side of sour cream. Nom.

~Josie

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3-Mushroom Stroganoff, 2 Ways

April 27, 2011

I’ve been thinking it’s time again for another super simple, comfort food recipe.  Something effortlessly delicious that you can whip up on a weeknight without too much prep or too many ingredients that still tastes a bit gourmet.  This stroganoff is just the ticket.  Made with oyster, shitake, and crimini mushrooms, (and pork chops, if you’re of the non-vegetarian persuasion) – it’s rich, creamy, and meaty (whether or not you add the pork chops), just like good comfort food should be.  Plus, it’s a cinch to make.

Oyster, Shitake, and Crimini Mushrooms waiting to become delicious stroganoff.

First, to explain the pork:  I know we’ve pretty consistently followed the path of this being a vegetarian blog, though we never explicitly laid it out as such.  It just sort of evolved that way from the beginning since Erik and I are both vegetarian.  The reality is that most of our readers are not.  So once in a while, I’d like to give a meat variation of the dishes we’re making.

Frying the pork chops for the meaty version.

A few notes:

I’ve been lucky enough to have access to my pick of a wide variety of fresh mushrooms at Martin’s, but if you have trouble finding the particular selection of mushrooms I used, by all means substitute with whatever you can find at your grocery store (this could easily be a 2-Mushroom Stroganoff as well).

I served this over jasmine rice because I had some on hand, but it would be equally delicious over pappardelle (wide egg noodles) or even mashed potatoes, if you’re feeling especially naughty.

For those of you wondering, no I didn’t give in to meat temptation on this recipe – My friend Edward cooked and ate the pork version.  It did smell very good though.  I can imagine the recipe would also work well with chicken if that’s what you prefer.

Lastly, this dish serves 2 very comfortably – even with leftovers, depending on how hungry you are – though, if you plan to serve more than 2-3 people, increase the recipe accordingly.

 

A dual view of the 2 versions of stroganoff, vegetarian on the left/meat on the right.

Vegetarian Three Mushroom Stroganoff

  • 3-ish tablespoons olive oil, for sautéing
  • 1/2 medium white or yellow onion, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely diced
  • 6 tablespoons butter
  • 2 cups each oyster, shitake, and crimini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
  • ¼ cup dry white wine
  • ½ tablespoon paprika
  • ¼ tsp. nutmeg
  • 1 cup sour cream

In a large pan over medium-medium high heat, sauté onions and garlic in olive oil until onions are cooked and translucent (Take care not to burn the garlic.  If it starts to brown, you know your heat is too high).

Sautéing the aromatics.

Add butter and sliced mushrooms to the pan, stirring to coat mushrooms and cook approximately ten minutes until tender and reduced in size (they REALLY cook down).

Cooking down the mushrooms in the onions, garlic, and butter.

Add wine to deglaze pan (This part is fun – it gets really steamy and sizzly!).  Then add paprika, nutmeg, and sour cream and continue to cook 3-4 minutes to heat through.

Deglazing the pan with dry white wine.

Adding the sour cream, (it MAKES this dish).

The sour cream ties everything together.

Serve over rice or egg noodles.  Enjoy!

Pork and Three Mushroom Stroganoff

  • 2 medium-sized pork chops, seasoned with salt and pepper
  • 1/2 medium white or yellow onion, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely diced
  • 5 tablespoons butter
  • 2 cups each oyster, shitake, and crimini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
  • ¼ cup dry white wine
  • ½ tablespoon paprika
  • ¼ tsp. nutmeg
  • 1 cup sour cream

Similar to the Vegetarian variation, but with the following changes:

First pan fry the pork chops, then remove from the pan and set aside.  Cook the onions and garlic in the fat rendered from the pork chops.

After adding the sour cream, nutmeg, and paprika; add the pork chops back into the pan to allow them to reheat and absorb the sauciness.

Serve over rice or egg noodles.

Served over jasmine rice with a side of roasted asparagus. Divine.

~ Josie

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Risotto, I Don’t Think We’re in Kansas Anymore

March 20, 2011

Risotto is certainly no newcomer to the table, but in case its charms and wonders have somehow slipped under your culinary radar, let me clue you in.  Risotto is a classic Italian dish made with Arborio rice that is cooked in a broth until the starches break down and it becomes rich and creamy.  Risotto is one of the most versatile dishes out there, and once you get the hang of the basic cooking process, the possibilities are virtually endless.

The queue of ingredients, waiting to go into the pot.

A few notes before you embark on your risotto journey:

First of all, don’t make risotto if you’re hungry.  This advice may sound counter-intuitive, but keep in mind, it takes almost an hour to make – if you’re starving you’ll wind up playing “eat the pantry” and ruining your dinner before it’s even on the table.  Make it when you’re almost hungry so it’s ready when you are.

Secondly, don’t plan on doing anything else while your risotto is cooking.  You really have to nurture it (i.e. watch it like a hawk and stir it constantly).  It demands your undivided attention.

Lastly, don’t let these points intimidate you.  If you’ve got the time and really have a taste for something special (or someone to impress), give it a try!  It can be done vegan or vegetarian (as shown below), or beefed up with meat stocks or seafood.  Either way, it’s a very worthwhile dish to have in your repertoire.

Coating the rice in oil. Nice action shot! (Photos by Edward B.)

Mushroom Asparagus Risotto

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil (for vegan) or butter (for vegetarian)
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • ½ cup diced white onion
  • 1 cup Arborio rice
  • ½ cup dry white wine (I used some leftover Pinot Grigio I had in the fridge – doesn’t need to be fancy)
  • 3 ½+ cups vegetable (or chicken or beef) stock, as needed (could also use mushroom broth if you can find it in your grocery store)
  • 1 1/2 cups sliced mushrooms, any variety
  • 1 ½ cups chopped asparagus, parboiled
  • ¼ cup shredded parmesan (optional)

In a large, shallow pan, sauté garlic and onions in oil/butter for 2-3 minutes.  Add rice and cook 2-3 minutes, letting the fat coat each grain.  Add wine all at once, stirring to allow rice to absorb wine.  Once wine is almost completely absorbed, add broth ½ at a time, stirring continually to incorporate liquid.  Add mushrooms halfway through, cooking with rice in broth.  Cook until rice is just barely al dente and risotto is thick and creamy.  Add asparagus.  Finish with parmesan cheese and serve immediately.  Enjoy!

Adding the asparagus to the mix. Mmm...so green.

~Josie

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Fresh and Fun Vegetarian Fajitas

March 13, 2011

Zut alors!  It has been quite a while since our last post.  In all honesty, I meant to post something up but simply kept procrastinating. <(-_-)>  I’ve been juggling a lot of recipes in the R&D department lately, most of which are still works-in-progress.  The recipe I wanted to share today I’ve tweaked a couple of times, and think I’ve finally got it to a share-worthy stage.

Since becoming a vegetarian, there are naturally some “off-limits” foods that I crave.  But, while it is occasionally a craving for the meat (OMG pork chops), more often than not, it is the spices and depth of flavor of the dish that I crave.  One of my favorite classically meaty dishes was fajitas.  I love the sound and scent of the sizzling plates, the gentle spiciness, and flavors reminiscent of citrus.  Now, while I do love me some veggie protein substitutes when it comes to tacos and such, I really didn’t want to rely on “meat” to bring this comforting dish to life.  For this recipe I enlisted the help of a trusted friend, butternut squash.  It’s slightly sweet, vibrantly orange — always a good decision.

Thoughts:

-You can use your favorite fajita seasoning (packet) if you don’t have all these spices on hand. However, all of these spices (perhaps sans ground coriander) should be in your cabinet. <(>.>)>

-Speaking of ground coriander, I used it here because my parents aren’t the biggest fans of cumin. I find that the coriander softens the pungency of the cumin, while enhancing the citrus flavor. P.S. Ground coriander is the seed of the lovely cilantro plant. ❤ Cilantro.

-Add more or less cayenne based on your fire threshold. This recipe should rank about a 2-3/10 on the spiciness scale.

-If you want to add a bean component to your dish, serve with some black beans jazzed up with chopped green chilis, diced onion, a sprinkle of fresh cilantro and diced tomato.

-You can garnish these fajitas with the typical fare, or opt for the Sweet and Spicy Sour Cream-y Cole Slaw — yes, it’s a mouthful but sooo worth it! — we whipped up (Recipe below).  It really offers a nice cooling contrast to the warm richness of the fajita veggies!

*disclosure: all photos are from recipe version 2.0 before addition of green peppers and coleslaw. Still delicious however.

 

Roasted Butternut Squash Fajitas

  • 1 ½ lb butternut squash, cut into ½ inch cubes
  • 1 sweet onion, cut in half-moon slices
  • 1 bell pepper of choice, sliced
  • 1 pkg of cremini or white mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 lime (zest+juice)
  • ½ tsp oregano
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp pepper
  • ¼ tsp cayenne pepper
  • ¼ tsp garlic powder
  • ¼ tsp onion powder
  • 4 Tbsp olive oil
  • Flour or corn tortillas (I favor the corn)

Preheat oven to 400° F.

Yah for shake and roast!

In a large bowl or a gallon size plastic bag toss in all ingredients. Mix/shake vigorously to get every bit nicely coated. Arrange in a single layer on a baking sheet or roasting pan and roast for 20-25 minutes or until the squash is tender and aroma irresistible.

So colorful! (well even more colorful with green peppers)

Scoop roasted veggies into a tortilla (or several) and top with your desired fixin’s. The cole-slaw topping was a nice addition by Josie that really makes this dish some good noms. P.S. This recipe is vegan friendly, well minus the sour cream, woot woot!

A before picture of the fajitas. I took an after but it was just an empty plate so...yeah. <(^_^)>

Sweet and Spicy Sour Cream-y Cole Slaw

  • 1 head green cabbage*, shredded
  • 1 head red cabbage*, shredded
  • 2 large carrots*, julienned
  • 5-6 radishes, julienned
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1/4 cup pineapple juice
  • juice of 1 lime
  • 1 tsp. cayenne pepper
  • 1 tbsp. chopped fresh cilantro
  • salt and pepper to taste

This recipe yields A LOT of cole slaw.  Reduce everything by half if you want a more managable amount, or see the following option:

*If you’re in a hurry, you can use a pre-packaged cole slaw veggie blend in place of the cabbage and carrots, in which case halve the sour cream sauce.

~Josephine and Erik <(^_^)>

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Sweet or Savory Pie: An Age Old Dilemma

December 7, 2010

Mmmm Pie. Just the word itself can bring delicious memories swirling to the surface (or fun math equations). Now I love sweets, but sometimes I have a hankering for something savory. This past weekend was a sometime. <(>.>)>

I had been seeing pies everywhere (i.e. magazines, stores, tv, my inbox, blogs…) and I absolutely had to have some. I really needed more buttery, flakey, crusty, goodness in my life. Also, I wanted to try making handpies for the first time. This way I could have hot pocket-esque meals in the freezer, ready to go the next time a craving struck. In my head I was imagining pies with an Asian flair. Something with a filling that was slightly creamy, spicy, and cilantro-y. I found the perfect jump-off recipe in my Best-ever Curry Cookbook.

Thoughts:

-I added turmeric & ground coriander for color and flavor to the pie dough. You can add any spice/color combo your heart desires.

-The original recipe called for a fresh Indian cheese, paneer (which is absolutely delicious) but I substituted tofu because I had it and needed to use it up.

-Garam masala is a spice blend that has become more readily available in larger chain stores and international stores. If unable to find you can easily make your own.

So delicious with sour cream.

Cilantro-y Tofu Mushroom Handpies

Crusty-crust (lol <(^_^)>)

  • 3 ¾c. all-purpose flour
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 ¼ cups cold salted butter (2 ½ sticks), cubed
  • 4 tbsp vegetable shortening
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 tbsp white vinegar
  • 4-6 tbsp cold water

Filling (Adapted from Best-ever Curry Cookbook by Mridula Baljekar)

  • 6 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 8 oz. firm tofu, in small ½ inch cubes
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh cilantro
  • 1 fresh spicy green chili of choice, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1 inch piece ginger, sliced
  • 1 tsp ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 3 c. button mushrooms (an 8oz. pkg)
  • 2 c. frozen peas, thawed (again 8oz. bag)
  • 1 c. chopped radishes
  • ¾ c plain yogurt mixed with 1 tsp cornstarch

To make crust:

Stir together the flour, coriander, and sugar with whisk or fork to “sift” it. Using a nifty pastry blender or two knives cut in the cold butter and shortening into the flour mixture. You want the consistency to be crumbly with the fats all nicely encased in the flour. Once all the flour has been blended in, stir in the egg, vinegar and a few tablespoons of water to the mixture. I like using my hands at this part to make sure everything comes together into a nice dough. Add more water if dough is dry, but you may not need it all. Don’t overwork the dough as your warm hands can make the dough melty. Form a disc and wrap in plastic. Let sit in the fridge for 30 minutes or longer to set up.

To make the filling:

Heat oil in a wok or large pan. Fry the tofu cubes until they are golden brown on all sides. Remove and drain on paper towel.

In a food processor grind onion, cilantro, chili pepper, garlic, and ginger until it is a fairly smooth paste. Remove and mix in turmeric and garam masala. Remove the excess oil from the pan, leaving behind about a tablespoon. Heat and fry the paste over medium heat for 8-10 minutes, or until the raw onion smell disappears and the oil separates.

Add in the mushrooms, peas, and fried tofu. Mix well and cook for 3-4 minutes allowing the mushrooms to cook. Bring heat down to low and gradually fold in the yogurt. Simmer for about 10 minutes. Set aside to cool, the cooler the filling the easier the pies will be to make. Fold in the radishes right before filling the pies.

To roll out dough:

Flour your workstation and rolling pin. Roll out the dough to about 1/8 inch thickness. Using a large bowl (7-8” diameter) cut out your dough circles. Re-roll and cut as necessary. You should be able to get around 12-14 circles depending on size.

Finally, making the handpies:

Preheat your oven to 400°. Take a crust and fill with a heaping spoonful or two (well 3-4 tablespoons if you need an exact-ish measurement) a little off-center. Then using a wet brush dipped in water, or just your finger, moisten the edge of the pastry and fold over the dough to make a half-moon (think tacos). To seal, take a fork and using the tines press the dough together. Cut two slits on the top for steam to escape.

Bake for 30-35 minutes until crust is golden browned and filling is bubbling. Serve with sour cream and nom away!

~Erik <(^_^)>

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B is for Beets; and Borscht, Coincidentally

December 2, 2010

The second ingredient of the recipe exchange is beets! Oddly enough, we’re two for two in terms of ingredient+recipe alliteration. First annatto+Andean potato stew and now this. Wonder how long it will continue on? Regardless, the colorful red root veggie was Josie’s choice for us and it was actually really interesting to work with.

I know what you are thinking. Eww. Gross. No. I was thinking that too. I’ve always seen beets as those sweet and sour red things at the salad bar. I tried them when I was little, but never really developed a taste for them. I just remember them being slightly sour and that they were bleeding into the mushrooms and boiled eggs lying adjacent to them on my salad plate.

So yesterday I went to the nearby Harris Teeter to procure some of these crimson orbs. I had seen them before in the produce section but never paid too much attention. When picking my bunch, I was shocked by how large the beet plus all the greens were. They barely fit in the bag. Fast forward to me in the kitchen. I had heard tales of the staining power of beets, but thought to myself “meh, I got this. I’m pretty graceful.” Haha. Good joke…hopefully those red droplets wash out from my orange Piggly Wiggly T-shirt. <(-_-)>

So the recipe that went along with the beets was for a vegetarian borscht soup. I liked where it was going, but of course changed everything around a bit. The ingredients are about the same, just changed the cooking method.

Thoughts:

-Roasted vegetables are always amazing to use in soups, IMHO.

-Next time I would try using extra seasonings in the soup to spice it up such as caraway seeds. While tasty, it could definitely use something extra/I wish I had some caraway…

-Potatoes would be a much-welcomed addition.

-I love mushrooms. ❤

Such a wonderfully deep red. Be careful, it stains!

Roasted Vegetable Borscht

  • 1 lb fresh beets (no canned junk)
  • 1 large sweet onion
  • 1 lb carrots
  • 1 lb cabbage, shredded finely
  • 8 cups vegetable broth
  • 2 large portabella caps
  • olive oil
  • salt & pepper to taste
  • lemon juice
  • chives
  • sour cream

Preheat the oven to 400° F. Clean the beets well to remove any dirt and grit. Chop off the leafy stems and set aside (you can cook these later). Using a peeler, remove the tougher outer layer from the beets. Set one smaller beet aside. Cut into 1 inch cubes. Peel carrots and cut in half, then dice. Cut the onion into half moons and slice thinly. Toss all the root vegetables with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for 20-25 minutes or until the vegetables are tender.

While the veggies are roasting, heat the broth until boiling. Add in the roasted vegetables and shredded cabbage. Reduce heat and let simmer for 20 minutes. While soup is simmering, roast the portabella caps upside down with olive oil, salt, and pepper until tender.

When soup has simmered, take the reserved beet and grate it into the soup. This will brighten up the color even further. At this point add the juice of ½ a lemon or a tablespoon or two. You want just enough to balance the sweetness from the beets. Let simmer for 5 more minutes. Adjust flavor to you liking with additional salt, pepper, and or lemon juice.

To serve, top with a dollop of sour cream, some slices of the roasted portabella, and a sprinkle of chives. Enjoy this deliciously sweet n’ sour warming winter nom.

~Erik <(^_^)>

P.S.

In case you were wondering about how to prep the beet greens:

Clean the stems and leaves to get rid of all the dirt and grit. Chop up the greens and put in a medium sauté pan and fill with about ½” of liquid be it broth or water. Season liberally with salt and pepper. Add a few teaspoons of lemon juice. Cook on high uncovered until the greens have cooked down to about nothing. Season as desired and enjoy. (Note be careful with the lemon juice…I may have gone overboard with my first attempt and the sourness was overpowering and couldn’t be overcome…wamp wamp<(>_<)>).