Posts Tagged ‘Cookies’

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Buttery Shortbread with an Oat-y Twist

April 18, 2011

Well it has been a while since I posted, but Josie has been keeping up with some very tasty stuff. Lately I have found that I have shifted again from cooking more savory dishes to making more desserts. Not necessarily a bad thing, but just haven’t been trying as many recipes lately.

Anyway, this week I bring you and oldie but a goodie. Well, old being that I came up with this one last year. One of my friends is obsessed with rolled oats, so much so she even has a cute little song about them. I dare not publish it here as she trying to keep it hush-hush while trying to peddle it off to a little brand called Quaker—you may have heard of it. Well I have found that through our friendship I seem to have fallen on board with the obsession. I really do love me some rolled oats. I also love me some shortbread . So I put these two together to make some tasty rich shortbread with the warmth of oats.

Thoughts:

-To make rolled oat flour, put about a cup of oats in the food processor and pulse until it becomes flour. That simple and it adds so much flavor. You can pulse a bunch to have on hand to mix into any recipe you want some oat-y goodness in.

-I add a tiny amount of cinnamon just to suggest some spicy warmth, but not overpower. You can add up to ½ tsp depending on how much you love cinnamon.

Rolled Oat Shortbread with Sea-Salt

  • ¾ c flour
  • ¾ c rolled oat flour
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 3 Tbsp sugar
  • 3 Tbsp brown sugar
  • ¾ cup unsalted butter (1 ½ sticks), cold cut into 1-inch slices
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • ¼ cup of oats to cut in and for sprinkling
  • Sea salt, raw sugar, and cinnamon for dusting

The recipe is pretty traditional for shortbread.

Preheat oven to 325°F. In a large bowl place your flours, salt, cinnamon, sugars, and vanilla. Add the butter and begin to cut it into the flour using two knives or a pastry blender. Once it really starts coming together add vanilla and about half of the oats for texture and cut it in as well. It should work into a thick dough.

Now, you can spray and flour a cake pan or 8×8 baking dish if you really want to, but these generally have no problem whatsoever coming out of the pan. Press the dough into the pan and sprinkle sea salt generously followed by some raw sugar. The raw sugar will give a nice crunch and the salt will bring out the earthy oat flavors. Sprinkle the remaining oats and a little cinnamon. Gently press into the dough. Bake for 1 hour and it will be a nice golden brown hue.

When you remove from the oven, score the shapes you want your shortbread pieces to be: wedges, squares, dinosaurs—Go crazy. Whatever you decide on remember these are some rich cookies; bite size morsels are good. Let cool for at least 30 minutes and then break on the scored lines and enjoy.

~Erik <(^_^)>

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D is for Demerara Sugar (Raw raw raw ahh ahh)

February 5, 2011

That’s just fancy talk for raw sugar. It probably seems like a rather simple ingredient, and while it is, it is a welcome addition to a recipe IMHO.

Demerara sugar typically has a light golden brown color, similar to that of brown sugar but its texture is actually more like that of regular white granulated sugar. It has a much nicer crunch factor though. So what makes demerara sugar so different (I kind of want to call it D-Shugg)? Well, I’ll tell you <(^_^)> ! All sugar is not created equal. D-Shugg comes from pressed sugar cane juice that is steamed and then becomes a thick syrup. This syrup is dehydrated and voila! in its wake it becomes crunchy, slightly molasses-y, and delicious. Fairly simple and natural process right? It’s sad that it is generally more expensive that refined white sugar <(T_T)>.  Wamp wamp. On an interesting note, its name comes from the Demerara colony in Guyana where it was originally sourced. Use this tidbit to impress that special someone at the next party you go to. <(^_~)>

Also, here in the U.S. we have our own version of raw sugar referred to as turbinado. For this type, the cane juice is spun in a turbine or centrifuge. It has a slight taste difference than demerara but they are pretty interchangeable. Regardless of your choice of sweetness, raw sugar has a higher moisture content so try and store in an airtight container like you would brown sugars.

This is a large granule raw sugar my parents bought me on a trip to Hawaii.

This is the more commonly available sugar in the raw. It has much smaller granules and is lighter in color.

Raw sugar is excellent way to play with the texture of a recipe that may need a little extra something to break up its uniformity. Enter baked goods! Lots of sweet baked goods such as cookies, muffins, and scones benefit greatly from the power of D-Shugg. Give it a chance. Oh hey—look I’ve even included a simple recipe that is amazing with our new found friend! Yah!

Thoughts:

-I got this recipe from my friend Kelly via Josie. Be careful. They are addicting.

-One of the most widely available brands of turbindo is “Sugar in the Raw” if you can’t find Demerara anywhere.

-If you want a heartier cookie, substitute 1 c whole wheat flour+ 1 c all purpose for the flour.

They're just so Sparkly! ❤ <(^_^)^

Kelly’s Molasses Ginger Chews

  • ¾ c butter, softened at room temp
  • 1 c light brown sugar
  • ¼ c molasses
  • 1 egg
  • 2 ¼ c flour
  • 2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp ginger
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground cloves
  • Raw Sugar (demerara or turbinado) For Rolling

Preheat the oven to 375°.

In a large bowl, cream the butter and sugar. My favorite method of doing this is using a large wooden spoon and mixing and smashing until it is light in color and combined ^_^ Alternately you can use a mixer and cream together. In another bowl sift together flour, baking soda, salt, and spices. Set aside.

Stir in molasses and egg into creamed butter until well combined. Then add 1c flour mixture. Stir then add in remaining flour.

Rolling on the mix of the two raw sugars I had.

Chill for 15 minutes in the freezer. Scoop out dough and shape into balls and roll in raw sugar.

Bake for 10-12 minutes, until “lovely”.  Should make about 2-3 dozen depending on the size of your rolled scoops.

They really are lovely! So good! Om nom nom.

This cookie has it all. Sweet, spicy, chewy, crunchy. Noms.

~Erik <(^_^)>