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3-Mushroom Stroganoff, 2 Ways

April 27, 2011

I’ve been thinking it’s time again for another super simple, comfort food recipe.  Something effortlessly delicious that you can whip up on a weeknight without too much prep or too many ingredients that still tastes a bit gourmet.  This stroganoff is just the ticket.  Made with oyster, shitake, and crimini mushrooms, (and pork chops, if you’re of the non-vegetarian persuasion) – it’s rich, creamy, and meaty (whether or not you add the pork chops), just like good comfort food should be.  Plus, it’s a cinch to make.

Oyster, Shitake, and Crimini Mushrooms waiting to become delicious stroganoff.

First, to explain the pork:  I know we’ve pretty consistently followed the path of this being a vegetarian blog, though we never explicitly laid it out as such.  It just sort of evolved that way from the beginning since Erik and I are both vegetarian.  The reality is that most of our readers are not.  So once in a while, I’d like to give a meat variation of the dishes we’re making.

Frying the pork chops for the meaty version.

A few notes:

I’ve been lucky enough to have access to my pick of a wide variety of fresh mushrooms at Martin’s, but if you have trouble finding the particular selection of mushrooms I used, by all means substitute with whatever you can find at your grocery store (this could easily be a 2-Mushroom Stroganoff as well).

I served this over jasmine rice because I had some on hand, but it would be equally delicious over pappardelle (wide egg noodles) or even mashed potatoes, if you’re feeling especially naughty.

For those of you wondering, no I didn’t give in to meat temptation on this recipe – My friend Edward cooked and ate the pork version.  It did smell very good though.  I can imagine the recipe would also work well with chicken if that’s what you prefer.

Lastly, this dish serves 2 very comfortably – even with leftovers, depending on how hungry you are – though, if you plan to serve more than 2-3 people, increase the recipe accordingly.

 

A dual view of the 2 versions of stroganoff, vegetarian on the left/meat on the right.

Vegetarian Three Mushroom Stroganoff

  • 3-ish tablespoons olive oil, for sautéing
  • 1/2 medium white or yellow onion, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely diced
  • 6 tablespoons butter
  • 2 cups each oyster, shitake, and crimini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
  • ¼ cup dry white wine
  • ½ tablespoon paprika
  • ¼ tsp. nutmeg
  • 1 cup sour cream

In a large pan over medium-medium high heat, sauté onions and garlic in olive oil until onions are cooked and translucent (Take care not to burn the garlic.  If it starts to brown, you know your heat is too high).

Sautéing the aromatics.

Add butter and sliced mushrooms to the pan, stirring to coat mushrooms and cook approximately ten minutes until tender and reduced in size (they REALLY cook down).

Cooking down the mushrooms in the onions, garlic, and butter.

Add wine to deglaze pan (This part is fun – it gets really steamy and sizzly!).  Then add paprika, nutmeg, and sour cream and continue to cook 3-4 minutes to heat through.

Deglazing the pan with dry white wine.

Adding the sour cream, (it MAKES this dish).

The sour cream ties everything together.

Serve over rice or egg noodles.  Enjoy!

Pork and Three Mushroom Stroganoff

  • 2 medium-sized pork chops, seasoned with salt and pepper
  • 1/2 medium white or yellow onion, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely diced
  • 5 tablespoons butter
  • 2 cups each oyster, shitake, and crimini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
  • ¼ cup dry white wine
  • ½ tablespoon paprika
  • ¼ tsp. nutmeg
  • 1 cup sour cream

Similar to the Vegetarian variation, but with the following changes:

First pan fry the pork chops, then remove from the pan and set aside.  Cook the onions and garlic in the fat rendered from the pork chops.

After adding the sour cream, nutmeg, and paprika; add the pork chops back into the pan to allow them to reheat and absorb the sauciness.

Serve over rice or egg noodles.

Served over jasmine rice with a side of roasted asparagus. Divine.

~ Josie

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Buttery Shortbread with an Oat-y Twist

April 18, 2011

Well it has been a while since I posted, but Josie has been keeping up with some very tasty stuff. Lately I have found that I have shifted again from cooking more savory dishes to making more desserts. Not necessarily a bad thing, but just haven’t been trying as many recipes lately.

Anyway, this week I bring you and oldie but a goodie. Well, old being that I came up with this one last year. One of my friends is obsessed with rolled oats, so much so she even has a cute little song about them. I dare not publish it here as she trying to keep it hush-hush while trying to peddle it off to a little brand called Quaker—you may have heard of it. Well I have found that through our friendship I seem to have fallen on board with the obsession. I really do love me some rolled oats. I also love me some shortbread . So I put these two together to make some tasty rich shortbread with the warmth of oats.

Thoughts:

-To make rolled oat flour, put about a cup of oats in the food processor and pulse until it becomes flour. That simple and it adds so much flavor. You can pulse a bunch to have on hand to mix into any recipe you want some oat-y goodness in.

-I add a tiny amount of cinnamon just to suggest some spicy warmth, but not overpower. You can add up to ½ tsp depending on how much you love cinnamon.

Rolled Oat Shortbread with Sea-Salt

  • ¾ c flour
  • ¾ c rolled oat flour
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 3 Tbsp sugar
  • 3 Tbsp brown sugar
  • ¾ cup unsalted butter (1 ½ sticks), cold cut into 1-inch slices
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • ¼ cup of oats to cut in and for sprinkling
  • Sea salt, raw sugar, and cinnamon for dusting

The recipe is pretty traditional for shortbread.

Preheat oven to 325°F. In a large bowl place your flours, salt, cinnamon, sugars, and vanilla. Add the butter and begin to cut it into the flour using two knives or a pastry blender. Once it really starts coming together add vanilla and about half of the oats for texture and cut it in as well. It should work into a thick dough.

Now, you can spray and flour a cake pan or 8×8 baking dish if you really want to, but these generally have no problem whatsoever coming out of the pan. Press the dough into the pan and sprinkle sea salt generously followed by some raw sugar. The raw sugar will give a nice crunch and the salt will bring out the earthy oat flavors. Sprinkle the remaining oats and a little cinnamon. Gently press into the dough. Bake for 1 hour and it will be a nice golden brown hue.

When you remove from the oven, score the shapes you want your shortbread pieces to be: wedges, squares, dinosaurs—Go crazy. Whatever you decide on remember these are some rich cookies; bite size morsels are good. Let cool for at least 30 minutes and then break on the scored lines and enjoy.

~Erik <(^_^)>

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How Very En-scone-cing…

April 2, 2011

Ah, the scone:  British teatime staple.  Warm, sweet, biscuity deliciousness.  What else could I possibly say?  Nothing.  Not even going to try.

Scone dough, rolled and cut.

There has been quite a lot of blogging going on at my house lately, what with trying to keep up with this blog and Erika revamping her site.  It’s a wonder our new cooking buddy, Edward, can keep up!  (many thanks to him, once again, for the lovely pictures — they make these scones look much fancier than they really are).  Though, what they lack in pretension, they more than make up for in deliciousness and ease of preparation.  I promise, this one is a no-brainer.

Brushing the tops of the scones with cream before baking.

It’s a very simple ingredient list, and quick and easy to make.  I was surprised to discover how much baking powder goes into the recipe (5 teaspoons, woah!), and I felt like I was doing something wrong.  Though, it’s not altogether surprising given that it’s pretty much the only leavening agent.

When you make these (and I know you’ll want to), feel free to use whole milk or half and half in place of the cream in this recipe to lighten it up.  I’m partial to cream…

Mmm...baked scones, fresh from the oven!

Don’t forget, also, the many many many possibilities of flavor combinations there are yet to be explored.  Blueberry, raspberry, cinnamon, cran orange, chocolate.  Personally, I can’t wait to experiment with savory scones.  I’m thinking cheddar cheese, (soy)bacon or sausage, chopped jalapenos…I could easily get carried away with this.  Whatever variety you decide to make, have fun with these muffin/biscuit hybrids!

Drizzling the scones with a quick glaze.

Now, the recipe:

Cranberry White Chocolate Scones

3 cups all purpose flour, plus extra for rolling

5 teaspoons baking powder

½ cup sugar

½ teaspoon salt

½ cup butter, cold and cut into pieces

1 cup heavy cream, plus extra for brushing

1 egg

½ cup cranberries

½ cup white chocolate chips

(1/2 cup chopped nuts would be delicious as well – I recommend pistachios)

In a large bowl, combine flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt.  Using a pastry blender (or two knives) cut butter into flour until you produce a fine crumb.

Beat egg into cream.  Blend all at once into flour/butter mixture – a wooden spoon would be best for this.  Work it all together into a dough.

Lightly flour your work surface.  Divide dough in half, shaping each half into a disc.  Flatten each disk to a 1-inch thickness, and slice into 8 wedges.

Transfer to a baking sheet, brush the top of each scone with cream.  Bake at 400 degrees for 13-15 minutes, or until slightly golden on top.  Remove from oven, and cool on a cooling rack.

If you’d like to make a glaze for your scones, whisk 1 cup of powdered sugar with 3-4 tablespoons of milk or cream and 1/2 teaspoon of vanilla.  Drizzle over the tops of the slightly-cooled scones.  Enjoy!

This is where it gets a little excessively fancy (read: obviously staged photo).

~Josie

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Risotto, I Don’t Think We’re in Kansas Anymore

March 20, 2011

Risotto is certainly no newcomer to the table, but in case its charms and wonders have somehow slipped under your culinary radar, let me clue you in.  Risotto is a classic Italian dish made with Arborio rice that is cooked in a broth until the starches break down and it becomes rich and creamy.  Risotto is one of the most versatile dishes out there, and once you get the hang of the basic cooking process, the possibilities are virtually endless.

The queue of ingredients, waiting to go into the pot.

A few notes before you embark on your risotto journey:

First of all, don’t make risotto if you’re hungry.  This advice may sound counter-intuitive, but keep in mind, it takes almost an hour to make – if you’re starving you’ll wind up playing “eat the pantry” and ruining your dinner before it’s even on the table.  Make it when you’re almost hungry so it’s ready when you are.

Secondly, don’t plan on doing anything else while your risotto is cooking.  You really have to nurture it (i.e. watch it like a hawk and stir it constantly).  It demands your undivided attention.

Lastly, don’t let these points intimidate you.  If you’ve got the time and really have a taste for something special (or someone to impress), give it a try!  It can be done vegan or vegetarian (as shown below), or beefed up with meat stocks or seafood.  Either way, it’s a very worthwhile dish to have in your repertoire.

Coating the rice in oil. Nice action shot! (Photos by Edward B.)

Mushroom Asparagus Risotto

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil (for vegan) or butter (for vegetarian)
  • 3 cloves garlic, chopped
  • ½ cup diced white onion
  • 1 cup Arborio rice
  • ½ cup dry white wine (I used some leftover Pinot Grigio I had in the fridge – doesn’t need to be fancy)
  • 3 ½+ cups vegetable (or chicken or beef) stock, as needed (could also use mushroom broth if you can find it in your grocery store)
  • 1 1/2 cups sliced mushrooms, any variety
  • 1 ½ cups chopped asparagus, parboiled
  • ¼ cup shredded parmesan (optional)

In a large, shallow pan, sauté garlic and onions in oil/butter for 2-3 minutes.  Add rice and cook 2-3 minutes, letting the fat coat each grain.  Add wine all at once, stirring to allow rice to absorb wine.  Once wine is almost completely absorbed, add broth ½ at a time, stirring continually to incorporate liquid.  Add mushrooms halfway through, cooking with rice in broth.  Cook until rice is just barely al dente and risotto is thick and creamy.  Add asparagus.  Finish with parmesan cheese and serve immediately.  Enjoy!

Adding the asparagus to the mix. Mmm...so green.

~Josie

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Fresh and Fun Vegetarian Fajitas

March 13, 2011

Zut alors!  It has been quite a while since our last post.  In all honesty, I meant to post something up but simply kept procrastinating. <(-_-)>  I’ve been juggling a lot of recipes in the R&D department lately, most of which are still works-in-progress.  The recipe I wanted to share today I’ve tweaked a couple of times, and think I’ve finally got it to a share-worthy stage.

Since becoming a vegetarian, there are naturally some “off-limits” foods that I crave.  But, while it is occasionally a craving for the meat (OMG pork chops), more often than not, it is the spices and depth of flavor of the dish that I crave.  One of my favorite classically meaty dishes was fajitas.  I love the sound and scent of the sizzling plates, the gentle spiciness, and flavors reminiscent of citrus.  Now, while I do love me some veggie protein substitutes when it comes to tacos and such, I really didn’t want to rely on “meat” to bring this comforting dish to life.  For this recipe I enlisted the help of a trusted friend, butternut squash.  It’s slightly sweet, vibrantly orange — always a good decision.

Thoughts:

-You can use your favorite fajita seasoning (packet) if you don’t have all these spices on hand. However, all of these spices (perhaps sans ground coriander) should be in your cabinet. <(>.>)>

-Speaking of ground coriander, I used it here because my parents aren’t the biggest fans of cumin. I find that the coriander softens the pungency of the cumin, while enhancing the citrus flavor. P.S. Ground coriander is the seed of the lovely cilantro plant. ❤ Cilantro.

-Add more or less cayenne based on your fire threshold. This recipe should rank about a 2-3/10 on the spiciness scale.

-If you want to add a bean component to your dish, serve with some black beans jazzed up with chopped green chilis, diced onion, a sprinkle of fresh cilantro and diced tomato.

-You can garnish these fajitas with the typical fare, or opt for the Sweet and Spicy Sour Cream-y Cole Slaw — yes, it’s a mouthful but sooo worth it! — we whipped up (Recipe below).  It really offers a nice cooling contrast to the warm richness of the fajita veggies!

*disclosure: all photos are from recipe version 2.0 before addition of green peppers and coleslaw. Still delicious however.

 

Roasted Butternut Squash Fajitas

  • 1 ½ lb butternut squash, cut into ½ inch cubes
  • 1 sweet onion, cut in half-moon slices
  • 1 bell pepper of choice, sliced
  • 1 pkg of cremini or white mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 lime (zest+juice)
  • ½ tsp oregano
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp pepper
  • ¼ tsp cayenne pepper
  • ¼ tsp garlic powder
  • ¼ tsp onion powder
  • 4 Tbsp olive oil
  • Flour or corn tortillas (I favor the corn)

Preheat oven to 400° F.

Yah for shake and roast!

In a large bowl or a gallon size plastic bag toss in all ingredients. Mix/shake vigorously to get every bit nicely coated. Arrange in a single layer on a baking sheet or roasting pan and roast for 20-25 minutes or until the squash is tender and aroma irresistible.

So colorful! (well even more colorful with green peppers)

Scoop roasted veggies into a tortilla (or several) and top with your desired fixin’s. The cole-slaw topping was a nice addition by Josie that really makes this dish some good noms. P.S. This recipe is vegan friendly, well minus the sour cream, woot woot!

A before picture of the fajitas. I took an after but it was just an empty plate so...yeah. <(^_^)>

Sweet and Spicy Sour Cream-y Cole Slaw

  • 1 head green cabbage*, shredded
  • 1 head red cabbage*, shredded
  • 2 large carrots*, julienned
  • 5-6 radishes, julienned
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 1/4 cup pineapple juice
  • juice of 1 lime
  • 1 tsp. cayenne pepper
  • 1 tbsp. chopped fresh cilantro
  • salt and pepper to taste

This recipe yields A LOT of cole slaw.  Reduce everything by half if you want a more managable amount, or see the following option:

*If you’re in a hurry, you can use a pre-packaged cole slaw veggie blend in place of the cabbage and carrots, in which case halve the sour cream sauce.

~Josephine and Erik <(^_^)>

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Two Steps Forward, One Step Back: The Case of the Reverse Red Velvet

February 24, 2011

So recently I was really craving some red velvet in my life. The problem is I get bored of the same things over and over again. For example, my dad absolutely loves chocolate chip cookies. He also likes most of the random cookies I’ve pieced together like Tazo Passion Chips, Triple Chocolate Tangelo, and White Chocolate Pistachio, but always defaults to requesting chocolate chip. Sure they are wonderful and delicious and homey, don’t get me wrong, but what they lack to me is a challenge. I’ve realized I like challenges. A lot.

Which brings me back to my dilemma; I wanted something that filled the void of being red velvet, without being red velvet per se. Thus came the idea for a reversed red velvet cake. In my head this cake would be cream-cheesy in the center and red chocolaty goodness on the outside. I feel this cake does just that, but left me a little “whelmed.” It turned out quite tasty and I was so happy to make a red icing without having to use a whole lot of dye (Pure red can be a quite the task to make, as more often than not it comes out pink or really fake nuclear red). The downside though, is that it just became a vanilla cake with a creamy filling and red chocolate frosting. It wasn’t as exciting as I had imagined.

Not all my ideas work out 100% of the time. At this point I’d like to quote one of my favorite teachers of all time.

“Take chances, make mistakes, get messy!” ~Ms. Frizzle

In baking and cooking, it’s important not to just have ideas, but to run with them. Make them into a reality. Worst-case scenario is that you make a wonderful mistake of a recipe (see here) or you learn how to improve your recipes slash realize they are awful. <(^_^)>

I may have lost this challenge to myself, but as a result I have even more new ideas that I want to try out.

Thoughts:

-If you don’t want to use cake mix in the frosting, you can substitute in a 2-3 Tbsp cocoa powder, an extra cup of powdered sugar, and red food coloring until you reach your desired level of crimson to chocolate ratio. Warning: You may need a LOT of red dye.

-This cream cheese pastry cream is fantastic! It reminds me a bit of the filling inside of those cheap and tasty Costco cakes, but hey — you can make it yourself! Woot woot!

-Trying out the cheesecake flavor of LorAnn oil I have discovered an essential flavor for my pantry. It tastes more like cake-batter than anything else. I foresee a lot of cake-batter flavored sweets and treats in the future.

-Next time I would cut each of the 8 inch cakes in half to have a total of 3 layers of pastry cream. That stuff is good. I could seriously eat it like pudding…well it kinda is just that.  <(>.>)>

Reverse Red Velvet Cake

Cake:

  • 2 c soymilk
  • 2 tsp. vinegar (apple cider variety if you have)
  • 2 ½ c. all-purpose flour
  • 4 Tbsp. cornstarch
  • 1 ½ tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 2/3 c. canola oil
  • 1 ¼ c. sugar
  • 2 drops of cheesecake flavor LorAnne oil (or 2 tsp vanilla extract)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour 2 8-inch cake pans.

Mix together the soy milk + vinegar and set aside to curdle for about 5 minutes. Meanwhile in a large bowl sift together the flour, cornstarch, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.

Add the oil, sugar, and flavoring to the curdled soymilk and beat together. Pour into the dry ingredients and mix until the lumpiness is gone.

Separate into the 2 cake pans and bake for 35-40 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Set aside to cool.

Cream Cheese Pastry Cream

  • 2 c. soymilk (or milk)
  • 4 egg yolks
  • ½ c. sugar
  • 4 Tbsp cornstarch
  • 6 oz. cream cheese (¾ of a brick)
  • ½ tsp vanilla ( I used vanilla bean paste for some flecks)

In a medium saucepan warm the milk until scalding. Meanwhile, in a large bowl whisk together the egg yolks, sugar, and cornstarch until light in color. In a small bowl, heat the cream cheese in the microwave for 30-45 seconds until melted and smooth. Now, slowly whisk the milk into the egg mixture until it all comes together. Return to saucepan over medium-high heat. Continue whisking for 3-4 minutes until the mixture thickens and bubbles. Whisk for 1 additional minute then remove from the heat. Fold in the cream cheese, cover with some plastic wrap, poke some holes and refrigerate for an hour or until chilled (The plastic wrap should touch the surface of the cream, so a skin doesn’t form while chilling).

Red Velvet Frosting

  • 1 c. butter or margarine (softened at room temp)
  • 1 ½ c sifted red velvet cake mix
  • 3 c. powdered sugar
  • ¾ c. soymilk or milk (more may be necessary)

Cream the butter until light and fluffy. Sift in the cake mix along with ¼ c. of the milk. Slowly alternate additions of the powdered sugar and the milk. The resulting frosting should be a nice spreading consistency. If too thick add more milk, if too thin add more sugar.

To assemble: fill layer(s) with the pastry cream, frost and enjoy!

~Erik <(^_^)>

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“Dynamite Pizza”, or The Best Pizza You’ll Ever Eat

February 17, 2011

I put off writing about this for a while because I know pizza is simple and it’s been done.  A lot.  True, anyone can throw some toppings and cheese on a crust and bake it.  But I promise you haven’t lived until you’ve tried this one.

I came across this crust recipe a few years ago in Cooking Light magazine, and I haven’t strayed since.  The truly amazing thing about this recipe is that it makes four crusts from one recipe, and you can have them ready to go in your fridge or freezer – making for a really fast and delicious weeknight meal. Plus, there’s just so much potential for creativity here!

In the past Erik and I have done everything from Greek Pizza, to Tomato Basil Mozzarella Pizza, to a Barbecue Pizza (a personal favorite which always receives rave reviews).  But the one I want to share here now is one of our latest and more delicious creations:  a Spinach, Artichoke, and Asparagus White Pizza; inspired by spinach artichoke dip.  It’s a great combination of fresh, green vegetables and rich, delicious cheesiness.  It’s certainly a nice break from the monotony of pepperoni pizza with tomato sauce, and well worth the extra effort (though it doesn’t take much).

The White Pizza, before baking.

Dynamite Pizza Dough

  • 1  package active dry yeast (or 2 1/4 teaspoons)
  • 1  cup  warm water
  • 1 1/4  cups  cold water
  • 2  tablespoons  olive oil
  • 1  teaspoon  sugar
  • 1  teaspoon  salt
  • 5 cups unbleached bread flour
  • Additional flour, for kneading

*For Wheat Crust, use 4 cups all purpose flour and 1 cup whole wheat flour.

Dissolve yeast in 1 cup warm water in a small bowl; let stand 5 minutes. Combine 1 1/4 cups cold water, oil, sugar, and salt in a small bowl; stir with a whisk.

Measure flour into bowl of stand mixer fitted with a dough hook.  Add yeast mixture, and cold water mixture to the flour.  Mix on low 8 minutes or until dough begins to form. Let rest 2 minutes.  Mix on low 6 more minutes. Turn dough out onto a floured surface. Knead until smooth and elastic (about 2 minutes); add additional flour if needed, 1 tablespoon at a time, to prevent dough from sticking to hands (dough will feel sticky).

Divide the dough in half (for thicker crust) or quarters (for thinner crust), and place each portion in a large zip-top bag. Seal and chill several hours or overnight. Let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes before rolling out.  Roll and stretch dough to desired size and shape.

Pizza bakes at 500° for 12 minutes.

Note: You can freeze the dough in heavy-duty, freezer-safe zip-top plastic bags for up to 2 months; thaw dough overnight in the refrigerator.

The dough can also be divided into smaller portions for personal pizzas or calzone.

Baked White Pizza, SO delicious!

Spinach Artichoke Asparagus White Pizza

White Sauce:

  • 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) butter or margarine
  • 4 ounces (1/2 brick) cream cheese
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
  • 2 cups milk or soymilk
  • 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder
  • 1/4 cup parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 teaspoon oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon basil

In a small saucepan, melt butter over medium heat.  Add the onion and garlic powder, stirring frequently.  Melt in cream cheese.  Stir in arrowroot powder to milk.  Add milk mixture, parmesan cheese, oregano, and basil to saucepan.  Stir until sauce begins to thicken.

Toppings:

  • 1 can artichoke hearts, chopped (kitchen shears work well for this)
  • 15-20 blanched asparagus spears (about 3 cups, cut in 2-inch pieces)
  • 1 cup cooked spinach (frozen spinach thawed and drained well is the easiest)
  • 1 1/2 cups shredded mozzarella cheese
  • 1 cup ricotta cheese

Assembly:

Makes 2 large pizzas.  If you only want to make one, reduce everything by half.

Place each prepared dough on a pizza pan.  Brush lightly with olive oil and spread on half of white sauce (it may look like there is too much sauce, but it soaks in quite a bit while it bakes).  Sprinkle spinach and mozzarella over sauce.  Top with artichokes and asparagus.  Scoop tablespoon sized balls of ricotta over the top of the pizza.  Bake at 500° for 12 minutes.  Indulge.

One last look at the finished pizza.

~Josie