Archive for April, 2011

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3-Mushroom Stroganoff, 2 Ways

April 27, 2011

I’ve been thinking it’s time again for another super simple, comfort food recipe.  Something effortlessly delicious that you can whip up on a weeknight without too much prep or too many ingredients that still tastes a bit gourmet.  This stroganoff is just the ticket.  Made with oyster, shitake, and crimini mushrooms, (and pork chops, if you’re of the non-vegetarian persuasion) – it’s rich, creamy, and meaty (whether or not you add the pork chops), just like good comfort food should be.  Plus, it’s a cinch to make.

Oyster, Shitake, and Crimini Mushrooms waiting to become delicious stroganoff.

First, to explain the pork:  I know we’ve pretty consistently followed the path of this being a vegetarian blog, though we never explicitly laid it out as such.  It just sort of evolved that way from the beginning since Erik and I are both vegetarian.  The reality is that most of our readers are not.  So once in a while, I’d like to give a meat variation of the dishes we’re making.

Frying the pork chops for the meaty version.

A few notes:

I’ve been lucky enough to have access to my pick of a wide variety of fresh mushrooms at Martin’s, but if you have trouble finding the particular selection of mushrooms I used, by all means substitute with whatever you can find at your grocery store (this could easily be a 2-Mushroom Stroganoff as well).

I served this over jasmine rice because I had some on hand, but it would be equally delicious over pappardelle (wide egg noodles) or even mashed potatoes, if you’re feeling especially naughty.

For those of you wondering, no I didn’t give in to meat temptation on this recipe – My friend Edward cooked and ate the pork version.  It did smell very good though.  I can imagine the recipe would also work well with chicken if that’s what you prefer.

Lastly, this dish serves 2 very comfortably – even with leftovers, depending on how hungry you are – though, if you plan to serve more than 2-3 people, increase the recipe accordingly.

 

A dual view of the 2 versions of stroganoff, vegetarian on the left/meat on the right.

Vegetarian Three Mushroom Stroganoff

  • 3-ish tablespoons olive oil, for sautéing
  • 1/2 medium white or yellow onion, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely diced
  • 6 tablespoons butter
  • 2 cups each oyster, shitake, and crimini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
  • ¼ cup dry white wine
  • ½ tablespoon paprika
  • ¼ tsp. nutmeg
  • 1 cup sour cream

In a large pan over medium-medium high heat, sauté onions and garlic in olive oil until onions are cooked and translucent (Take care not to burn the garlic.  If it starts to brown, you know your heat is too high).

Sautéing the aromatics.

Add butter and sliced mushrooms to the pan, stirring to coat mushrooms and cook approximately ten minutes until tender and reduced in size (they REALLY cook down).

Cooking down the mushrooms in the onions, garlic, and butter.

Add wine to deglaze pan (This part is fun – it gets really steamy and sizzly!).  Then add paprika, nutmeg, and sour cream and continue to cook 3-4 minutes to heat through.

Deglazing the pan with dry white wine.

Adding the sour cream, (it MAKES this dish).

The sour cream ties everything together.

Serve over rice or egg noodles.  Enjoy!

Pork and Three Mushroom Stroganoff

  • 2 medium-sized pork chops, seasoned with salt and pepper
  • 1/2 medium white or yellow onion, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely diced
  • 5 tablespoons butter
  • 2 cups each oyster, shitake, and crimini mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
  • ¼ cup dry white wine
  • ½ tablespoon paprika
  • ¼ tsp. nutmeg
  • 1 cup sour cream

Similar to the Vegetarian variation, but with the following changes:

First pan fry the pork chops, then remove from the pan and set aside.  Cook the onions and garlic in the fat rendered from the pork chops.

After adding the sour cream, nutmeg, and paprika; add the pork chops back into the pan to allow them to reheat and absorb the sauciness.

Serve over rice or egg noodles.

Served over jasmine rice with a side of roasted asparagus. Divine.

~ Josie

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Buttery Shortbread with an Oat-y Twist

April 18, 2011

Well it has been a while since I posted, but Josie has been keeping up with some very tasty stuff. Lately I have found that I have shifted again from cooking more savory dishes to making more desserts. Not necessarily a bad thing, but just haven’t been trying as many recipes lately.

Anyway, this week I bring you and oldie but a goodie. Well, old being that I came up with this one last year. One of my friends is obsessed with rolled oats, so much so she even has a cute little song about them. I dare not publish it here as she trying to keep it hush-hush while trying to peddle it off to a little brand called Quaker—you may have heard of it. Well I have found that through our friendship I seem to have fallen on board with the obsession. I really do love me some rolled oats. I also love me some shortbread . So I put these two together to make some tasty rich shortbread with the warmth of oats.

Thoughts:

-To make rolled oat flour, put about a cup of oats in the food processor and pulse until it becomes flour. That simple and it adds so much flavor. You can pulse a bunch to have on hand to mix into any recipe you want some oat-y goodness in.

-I add a tiny amount of cinnamon just to suggest some spicy warmth, but not overpower. You can add up to ½ tsp depending on how much you love cinnamon.

Rolled Oat Shortbread with Sea-Salt

  • ¾ c flour
  • ¾ c rolled oat flour
  • ½ tsp. salt
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 3 Tbsp sugar
  • 3 Tbsp brown sugar
  • ¾ cup unsalted butter (1 ½ sticks), cold cut into 1-inch slices
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • ¼ cup of oats to cut in and for sprinkling
  • Sea salt, raw sugar, and cinnamon for dusting

The recipe is pretty traditional for shortbread.

Preheat oven to 325°F. In a large bowl place your flours, salt, cinnamon, sugars, and vanilla. Add the butter and begin to cut it into the flour using two knives or a pastry blender. Once it really starts coming together add vanilla and about half of the oats for texture and cut it in as well. It should work into a thick dough.

Now, you can spray and flour a cake pan or 8×8 baking dish if you really want to, but these generally have no problem whatsoever coming out of the pan. Press the dough into the pan and sprinkle sea salt generously followed by some raw sugar. The raw sugar will give a nice crunch and the salt will bring out the earthy oat flavors. Sprinkle the remaining oats and a little cinnamon. Gently press into the dough. Bake for 1 hour and it will be a nice golden brown hue.

When you remove from the oven, score the shapes you want your shortbread pieces to be: wedges, squares, dinosaurs—Go crazy. Whatever you decide on remember these are some rich cookies; bite size morsels are good. Let cool for at least 30 minutes and then break on the scored lines and enjoy.

~Erik <(^_^)>

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How Very En-scone-cing…

April 2, 2011

Ah, the scone:  British teatime staple.  Warm, sweet, biscuity deliciousness.  What else could I possibly say?  Nothing.  Not even going to try.

Scone dough, rolled and cut.

There has been quite a lot of blogging going on at my house lately, what with trying to keep up with this blog and Erika revamping her site.  It’s a wonder our new cooking buddy, Edward, can keep up!  (many thanks to him, once again, for the lovely pictures — they make these scones look much fancier than they really are).  Though, what they lack in pretension, they more than make up for in deliciousness and ease of preparation.  I promise, this one is a no-brainer.

Brushing the tops of the scones with cream before baking.

It’s a very simple ingredient list, and quick and easy to make.  I was surprised to discover how much baking powder goes into the recipe (5 teaspoons, woah!), and I felt like I was doing something wrong.  Though, it’s not altogether surprising given that it’s pretty much the only leavening agent.

When you make these (and I know you’ll want to), feel free to use whole milk or half and half in place of the cream in this recipe to lighten it up.  I’m partial to cream…

Mmm...baked scones, fresh from the oven!

Don’t forget, also, the many many many possibilities of flavor combinations there are yet to be explored.  Blueberry, raspberry, cinnamon, cran orange, chocolate.  Personally, I can’t wait to experiment with savory scones.  I’m thinking cheddar cheese, (soy)bacon or sausage, chopped jalapenos…I could easily get carried away with this.  Whatever variety you decide to make, have fun with these muffin/biscuit hybrids!

Drizzling the scones with a quick glaze.

Now, the recipe:

Cranberry White Chocolate Scones

3 cups all purpose flour, plus extra for rolling

5 teaspoons baking powder

½ cup sugar

½ teaspoon salt

½ cup butter, cold and cut into pieces

1 cup heavy cream, plus extra for brushing

1 egg

½ cup cranberries

½ cup white chocolate chips

(1/2 cup chopped nuts would be delicious as well – I recommend pistachios)

In a large bowl, combine flour, baking powder, sugar, and salt.  Using a pastry blender (or two knives) cut butter into flour until you produce a fine crumb.

Beat egg into cream.  Blend all at once into flour/butter mixture – a wooden spoon would be best for this.  Work it all together into a dough.

Lightly flour your work surface.  Divide dough in half, shaping each half into a disc.  Flatten each disk to a 1-inch thickness, and slice into 8 wedges.

Transfer to a baking sheet, brush the top of each scone with cream.  Bake at 400 degrees for 13-15 minutes, or until slightly golden on top.  Remove from oven, and cool on a cooling rack.

If you’d like to make a glaze for your scones, whisk 1 cup of powdered sugar with 3-4 tablespoons of milk or cream and 1/2 teaspoon of vanilla.  Drizzle over the tops of the slightly-cooled scones.  Enjoy!

This is where it gets a little excessively fancy (read: obviously staged photo).

~Josie